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Our fund raising round was not successful.  As a result, IDB will be going off line and into cold storage.  If our competitors should stumble, I may re-active the site in the future but for now, we're turning out the lights.

I had planned to go off-line on April 4th.  Due to some important and unplanned changes in our maintenance schedule, I am now bumping that up to next Tuesday morning, March 27th, 2018.  PM 'admin' if you need to reach me. 

You should use the next 5 days to find a new home for your community.

Running IDB has been fun over the years and I hope you enjoyed your time here as well.  Sincerely,  Paul

P.S. News on IDB Funding -- this is now on it's own page to clean up the site a bit.

How The Arab Spring Shakes Up The Oil Markets

testosteronepit.com / By Wolf Richter / SEPTEMBER 17, 2013 AT 12:15PM

By Farah Halime, a business journalist in Cairo and Visiting Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations focusing on Egypt’s economy. This post originally appeared on Rebel Economy.

Among the first reactors to the Arab Spring back in January 2011 were the oil markets. The oil price, already volatile in the aftermath of the global financial crisis, became even more unstable as concerns that the oil supply would be choked off if the political problems of the Middle East affected global oil production.

Now, the world is dependant on a few Gulf countries, namely Saudi Arabia, to fill the supply gap. But should the Arab Spring countries, the majority of whom are not big oil producers, be a primary concern for unstable oil markets? Indeed, sometimes the oil market can be wrong, like it was on Egypt. Sometimes the oil market can prepare for the worst case scenario as it did on Syria.

Rebel Economy asked Justin Dargin, an energy and Middle East scholar at the University of Oxford, to break down the misconceptions we have about the oil market and its relation to Arab countries in transition.

Dargin has advised some of the largest oil companies in the world and worked in the legal department at the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries also advising on multilateral initiatives.

  • The oil market has been at one of its most unstable points since World War Two. Many have linked the risks from the countries of the Arab Spring to this tumultuous period. Is this a fair assumption?