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Our fund raising round was not successful.  As a result, IDB will be going off line and into cold storage.  If our competitors should stumble, I may re-active the site in the future but for now, we're turning out the lights.

I had planned to go off-line on April 4th.  Due to some important and unplanned changes in our maintenance schedule, I am now bumping that up to next Tuesday morning, March 27th, 2018.  PM 'admin' if you need to reach me. 

You should use the next 5 days to find a new home for your community.

Running IDB has been fun over the years and I hope you enjoyed your time here as well.  Sincerely,  Paul

P.S. News on IDB Funding -- this is now on it's own page to clean up the site a bit.

The Bankers’ Endgame and the Rise of Gold and Silver

The Bankers’ Endgame and the Rise of Gold and Silver

news.goldseek.com / By Darryl Robert Schoon / 10 July 2017

We’re going to owe Chicken Little an apology

In May 2007, in Subprime America Infects Asia and Europe I predicted a severe financial crisis was imminent: the risks that have lain dormant beneath globalization’s foundation are about to erupt and a reordering of the world’s financial geography is about to ensue. It’s spring 2007 and the sun is shining in the US, backyard BBQs are being cleaned in anticipation of summer’s use. A severe financial crisis, however, is in the offing; a crisis as unexpected as the Golden State Warrior’s last minute steak to the NBA playoffs.

An unexpected financial crisis, however, will be much more consequential than Don Nelson’s magical resurrection of the Warrior’s NBA hopes. There, at least, the Warriors will have a chance. But because most people don’t know a financial crisis is coming, they will have little chance of survival. This summer, America’s subprime CDOs are coming home to roost, and not just to the US.

In July 2007, two multi-billion dollar subprime hedge funds collapsed. One year later, the greatest financial crisis since the 1930s bankrupted Wall Street banks; real estate fell 40–70%; and central banks flooded markets with zero-cost credit and trillions of dollars in quantitative easing to keep stocks from crashing, setting in motion a still-inflating stock market bubble to replace the collapsed 2002-2007 real estate bubble that revived markets after the 2000 dot.com crash.

After the 2008 crisis, unprecedented central bank efforts to prevent the bankers’ endgame temporarily delayed its inevitable resolution. Today, however, the banker’s edifice of debt has reached such levels that systemic dangers, e.g. speculative bubbles, low inflation, low growth, etc. increasingly threaten global markets. The bankers’ endgame is accelerating.