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In response to zh c/s...Russian sanctions and EU response by easy (06/17/2017, 6:57pm)

Re: zh c/s...Russian sanctions and EU response

the following is true from personal observations and experience:

in the late 60's anti-american sentiment in Europe, and particularly in Germany was prevalent.

Many Americans came to Europe and displayed themselves as conquerors--in one manner or another--but particularly in  not respecting the cultures of the day

and demanding special treatment.

These demands were not received well.


In the early 70's returned and worked in Europe.

No one would rent my spouse and I an apartment. We received numerous comments about "americans"--which were not positive.

It took some magical intervention by a respected person to get us a place to live.
It also took almost 3 mos
I worked but was not paid by the relevant government for 6 months--while they ran all sorts of tests etc.-- typical BS but somehow out of 17 people I was the only one who experienced it.
Obviously P/O ed some one ... in the long line of stamps
my sense was that Europeans had suffered mightly in both ww's. Despite having been rescued and saved by the US along with the Russians, (the Russians had done enormous harm in the conquerage (sic) )--the US had not brutalised the European peoples.
However, the US appeared to have let the use of their money and forces to save Europe and the subsequent reconstruction of Europe ( twice)  go to their head and the saved were unhappy at what may have appeared to them as a US takeover.
I do know that my spouse and I were welcomed by some really good people but generally were on the outside-- and living in Europe then  were difficult times for us.
Simply put--we were not wanted...just needed.

Then the presence of Russia anywhere in our existence was at best opaque and really just unobservable. Russia was shut off. A visit to East Berlin was an eye opener.